Make half the grains you eat whole grains: An easy way to eat more whole grains is to switch from a refined-grain food to a whole-grain food. For example, eat whole-wheat bread instead of white bread. Read the ingredients list and choose products that list a whole-grain ingredients first. Look for things like: "whole wheat," "brown rice," "bulgur," "buckwheat," "oatmeal," "rolled oats," quinoa," or "wild rice."
Many women and teenage girls don't get enough calcium. Calcium-rich foods are critical to healthy bones and can help you avoid osteoporosis, a bone-weakening disease. Additionally, recent studies suggest that consuming calcium-rich foods as part of a healthy diet may aid weight loss in obese women while minimizing bone turnover. The National Institute of Medicine recommends the following calcium intake, for different ages:
The daily calcium recommendations are 1,000 milligrams a day for women under 50, and 1,500 milligrams a day for women 51 and older. Oddly enough, these are the same requirements for men, who are much less prone to osteoporosis than women. But the recommendation takes into account the fact that women are smaller than men. Thus the amount of daily calcium is greater for women on a proportional basis.
Also, once a dietary supplement is on the market, the FDA monitors information on the product's label and package insert to make sure that information about the supplement's content is accurate and that any claims made for the product are truthful and not misleading. The Federal Trade Commission, which polices product advertising, also requires all information about a dietary supplement product to be truthful and not misleading.
Scientists still have much to learn even about common vitamins. One recent study found unexpected evidence about vitamin E. Earlier research suggested that men who took vitamin E supplements might have a lower risk of developing prostate cancer. “But much to our surprise, a large NIH-funded clinical trial of more than 29,000 men found that taking supplements of vitamin E actually raised—not reduced—their risk of this disease,” says Dr. Paul M. Coates, director of NIH’s Office of Dietary Supplements. That’s why it’s important to conduct clinical studies of supplements to confirm their effects.

SOURCES: Institute of Medicine Food and Nutrition Board, Dietary Reference Intakes: "Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D and Fluoride." National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1999. Journal of Nutrition, October 2005. Position paper of the American Dietetic Association on Food Fortification and Supplementation, Journal of the American Dietetic Association, August 2005. Michael Holick, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, physiology, and biophysics, Boston University Medical Center.  Andrew Shoa, PhD, vice president for regulatory affairs, Council for Responsible Nutrition. Alice Lichtenstein, DSc, director and senior scientist, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University. Dave Grotto, RD, spokesman, American Dietetic Association; author, 101 Foods That Could Save Your Life.  Eduardo Baetti, MD, rheumatologist; Kaiser Permanente. Patrick Rea, editorial director, Nutrition Business Journal.  Kristine Clark, PhD, RD, director of sports nutrition, Penn State University. Vasilios Frankos, PhD, Division of Dietary Supplement Programs, FDA. Sarubin, A. The Health Professionals Guide to Popular Dietary Supplements, American Dietetic Association, Chicago, IL, 2000. FDA. WebMD Weight Loss Clinic Feature: "Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D?" National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Questions and Answers About Homeopathy."
Nutritional supplements may be designed to provide specialized support for athletes. Some of these consist of high-protein products, such as amino acid supplements, while other products contain nutrients that support metabolism, energy, and athletic performance and recovery. People engaging in intense athletic activity may have increased needs for water-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and certain minerals, including chromium. Sports drinks contain blends of electrolytes (salts) that the body loses during exertion and sweating, as well as vitamins, minerals, and performance-supporting herbs.
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